Biodiversity Strategy

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The consultation has concluded.

We appreciate the time and effort you took to share your thoughts and ideas with us. Your input is invaluable in helping us develop a better understanding of how we can protect our local wildlife.

Thank you for your participation. 

This survey has now closed - if you still have thoughts and ideas on improving biodiversity in Norwich, you can add them to our Big Biodiversity Conversation page.

We are seeking your feedback and ideas to inform our Biodiversity Strategy 2022-2032 and the associated Biodiversity Action Plan.

The draft Biodiversity Strategy 2022-2032 is a key part of delivering against our priorities and ambitions to address the twin climate and biodiversity emergencies. The associated action plan is being developed and hasn't been published yet - we want your ideas for specific opportunities to help improve biodiversity across the city, which will then be added to the plan.

The council has already carried out significant work to improve the quality of our local nature reserves and wildlife sites in order to increase biodiversity. But we want to go further and faster - this new strategy sets out our ambition, proposing an enhanced commitment to ‘create a city where biodiversity can recover and thrive, halt species decline and increase species diversity and abundance by 2030’.

You can read the draft strategy in the 'Documents' section on this page.

Tackling climate change and boosting biodiversity is an ongoing challenge, and everyone can play their part. We are encouraging residents, community groups and businesses to participate in our collective efforts as a city - find out more by clicking 'Get Involved' below.

This survey has now closed - if you still have thoughts and ideas on improving biodiversity in Norwich, you can add them to our Big Biodiversity Conversation page.

We are seeking your feedback and ideas to inform our Biodiversity Strategy 2022-2032 and the associated Biodiversity Action Plan.

The draft Biodiversity Strategy 2022-2032 is a key part of delivering against our priorities and ambitions to address the twin climate and biodiversity emergencies. The associated action plan is being developed and hasn't been published yet - we want your ideas for specific opportunities to help improve biodiversity across the city, which will then be added to the plan.

The council has already carried out significant work to improve the quality of our local nature reserves and wildlife sites in order to increase biodiversity. But we want to go further and faster - this new strategy sets out our ambition, proposing an enhanced commitment to ‘create a city where biodiversity can recover and thrive, halt species decline and increase species diversity and abundance by 2030’.

You can read the draft strategy in the 'Documents' section on this page.

Tackling climate change and boosting biodiversity is an ongoing challenge, and everyone can play their part. We are encouraging residents, community groups and businesses to participate in our collective efforts as a city - find out more by clicking 'Get Involved' below.

The consultation has concluded.

We appreciate the time and effort you took to share your thoughts and ideas with us. Your input is invaluable in helping us develop a better understanding of how we can protect our local wildlife.

Thank you for your participation. 

  • Nature Recovery Network

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    One of the main objectives of the draft Biodiversity Strategy 2022-2032 is to develop a Nature Recovery Network across the city. A Nature Recovery Network will join up the natural world, connecting wild places and habitats across the city are to give nature room to thrive.

    The draft strategy sets out a commitment for the Nature Recovery Network to be significantly complete by 2030 in order to halt species decline and increase species diversity and abundance.

    This Nature Recovery Network is proposed to consist of:

    • Nature hubs such as existing wildlife sites and parkland and newly created green spaces. The hubs are where species enjoy protection and where they can initially thrive.
    • Nature corridors, which may take the form of designated parts of the city including streets, green spaces on and around buildings and highway verges, for example. The corridors allow nature to recover into more densely populated areas of the city.
    • Nature infill - opportunities to ‘infill’ the network in the areas in between hubs and corridors will be sought, in the form of promoting nature recovery in smaller green spaces in the built environment, such as gardens, smaller green areas around buildings, balconies and planters.