Biodiversity Strategy

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The consultation has concluded.

We appreciate the time and effort you took to share your thoughts and ideas with us. Your input is invaluable in helping us develop a better understanding of how we can protect our local wildlife.

Thank you for your participation. 

This survey has now closed - if you still have thoughts and ideas on improving biodiversity in Norwich, you can add them to our Big Biodiversity Conversation page.

We are seeking your feedback and ideas to inform our Biodiversity Strategy 2022-2032 and the associated Biodiversity Action Plan.

The draft Biodiversity Strategy 2022-2032 is a key part of delivering against our priorities and ambitions to address the twin climate and biodiversity emergencies. The associated action plan is being developed and hasn't been published yet - we want your ideas for specific opportunities to help improve biodiversity across the city, which will then be added to the plan.

The council has already carried out significant work to improve the quality of our local nature reserves and wildlife sites in order to increase biodiversity. But we want to go further and faster - this new strategy sets out our ambition, proposing an enhanced commitment to ‘create a city where biodiversity can recover and thrive, halt species decline and increase species diversity and abundance by 2030’.

You can read the draft strategy in the 'Documents' section on this page.

Tackling climate change and boosting biodiversity is an ongoing challenge, and everyone can play their part. We are encouraging residents, community groups and businesses to participate in our collective efforts as a city - find out more by clicking 'Get Involved' below.

This survey has now closed - if you still have thoughts and ideas on improving biodiversity in Norwich, you can add them to our Big Biodiversity Conversation page.

We are seeking your feedback and ideas to inform our Biodiversity Strategy 2022-2032 and the associated Biodiversity Action Plan.

The draft Biodiversity Strategy 2022-2032 is a key part of delivering against our priorities and ambitions to address the twin climate and biodiversity emergencies. The associated action plan is being developed and hasn't been published yet - we want your ideas for specific opportunities to help improve biodiversity across the city, which will then be added to the plan.

The council has already carried out significant work to improve the quality of our local nature reserves and wildlife sites in order to increase biodiversity. But we want to go further and faster - this new strategy sets out our ambition, proposing an enhanced commitment to ‘create a city where biodiversity can recover and thrive, halt species decline and increase species diversity and abundance by 2030’.

You can read the draft strategy in the 'Documents' section on this page.

Tackling climate change and boosting biodiversity is an ongoing challenge, and everyone can play their part. We are encouraging residents, community groups and businesses to participate in our collective efforts as a city - find out more by clicking 'Get Involved' below.

Get Involved

Interested parties

We recognise that Norwich City Council cannot alone bring about sustained nature recovery across the city and so we are seeking to collaborate with organisations with an interest in biodiversity and nature recovery that can facilitate change.

If you think that your organization could be an Interested Party, please email: biodiversity@norwich.gov.uk

Biodiversity Champions

Biodiversity Champions are members of the public who can act in their local community to help improve biodiversity. They may, for example, help mobilise a group of residents who live locally to each other by acting as a point of contact with the Council and sharing ideas and resources to improve biodiversity. 

If you wish to be a Biodiversity Champion, please email biodiversity@norwich.gov.uk stating your name and the ward you live in.

Citizen Scientists 

Citizen Scientists are members of the public who have developed detailed knowledge, either through their own learning journey or formal education, or both. The Council seeks to collaborate with Citizen Scientists to help survey ecology and to help develop new approaches to improving biodiversity through habitat creation or management. 

If you wish to be a Citizen Scientist, please email biodiversity@norwich.gov.uk stating your name, the ward you live in, and tell us about your specialist knowledge.

Pictures for use in the final draft of the Strategy  

The photo of the beautiful Common Blue Butterfly at the top of this page was kindly provided by Norfolk photographer Kiri Stuart-Clarke. For the final version of the Biodiversity Strategy, we would like to receive pictures taken by members of the public in Norwich, on the themes of nature, wildlife and biodiversity in the city.  

Please email your photos to biodiversity@norwich.gov.uk 

The consultation has concluded.

We appreciate the time and effort you took to share your thoughts and ideas with us. Your input is invaluable in helping us develop a better understanding of how we can protect our local wildlife.

Thank you for your participation. 

You need to be signed in to comment in this Guest Book. Click here to Sign In or Register to get involved

The most economical and low-carbon way to increase diversity is natural regeneration. That is simply leaving the land untended. It avoids the energy costs involved in the production of plants and seeds and their transportation to the area.
It also serves as a reminder to people of the pace of nature as it will take decades before it reaches a state of homeostasis. Finding an area that is suitable may be difficult, but when found needs to be securely fenced off and then left except for litter picking etc. The area can be crossed by paths for walking and cycling, provided those paths are enclosed in a pergola tunnel.
Yearly visits by school children would acquaint them with the rate at which nature works. Proper documentation and exhibition would allow visitors to appreciate the change over the years.
benign neglect is a powerful and efficient tool for regeneration and rewilding.

JB125 over 1 year ago

The most economical and low-carbon way to increase diversity is natural regeneration. That is simply leaving the land untended. It avoids the energy costs involved in the production of plants and seeds and their transportation to the area.
It also serves as a reminder to people of the pace of nature as it will take decades before it reaches a state of homeostasis. Finding an area that is suitable may be difficult, but when found needs to be securely fenced off and then left except for litter picking etc. The area can be crossed by paths for walking and cycling, provided those paths are enclosed in a pergola tunnel.
Yearly visits by school children would acquaint them with the rate at which nature works. Proper documentation and exhibition would allow visitors to appreciate the change over the years.
benign neglect is a powerful and efficient tool for regeneration and rewilding.

JB125 over 1 year ago